Kendall Hunt Publishing

PROGRAM FEATURES


“The Great Chicago Fire” learning unit is a national case study involving students in the lessons to be learned when a major community tragedy strikes. The legacy to be learned by this unit is turning “Tragedy into Triumph.”

As a result of this massive 1871 tragedy, national attention was on Chicago as a leader of determination, innovation and spirit when rebuilding the city. Lessons learned resulted in the invention of the first skyscraper. From this ruble, Chicago grew into a national transportation hub, an international finance district, a publishing capital, a technology industry information leader, and a world-wide cultural center, all driven through the will and spirit of its citizens.

Unit Objectives:

  1. Students will use inquiry research to write an article for the school newspaper about the time period just before the Chicago Fire of 1871.
  2. Students will use digital resources and identify possible explanations for the onset of the great fire and investigate how the fire started along with possible extenuating factors that were involved.
  3. Students will locate information about the city’s investigation into the onset of the fire, outline the results of the investigation, and present their information.
  4. Students will review the eyewitness accounts and other evidence chronicling the events surrounding the Great Chicago Fire.
  5. Students will analyze multiple perspectives on the impact of the fire on Chicago society in 1871, using a variety of primary sources from this seminal period in American urban history.
  6. Students will evaluate primary sources germane to the period to determine why the Great Chicago Fire of 1871 was so destructive and the magnitude of damage so expansive.
  7. Students will formulate research questions about the aftermath of the Great Chicago Fire.
  8. Students will evaluate primary sources germane to the period following the Great Chicago Fire.
  9. Students will construct a presentation using primary sources conveying their conclusions about the effects of the Great Chicago Fire.

CUSTOMIZED SHOPPING FOR:

History

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Involving American students in the governance of their communities, states, and country is a lifelong educational responsibility, and a major goal of the new Federal Mandates, and similar Mandated State Goals.

The “How to Pass a Bill” unit is staged in Illinois, but is similar to other states and the Federal Government in how a bill becomes a law. This unit covers the Executive, Legislature and Judicial Branches of Government and how they affect our daily lives.

Involvement in our student’s future, and an on-going life lesson, is the key message in this unit: LEARN, PARTICIPATE, VOTE.

Unit Objectives:

  1. Identify the leaders of each branch of Illinois state government.
  2. List duties of each branch of Illinois state government.
  3. Construct a presentation using the information gathered about the three branches of Illinois government.
  4. Students will examine the roles and responsibilities of the Legislative and Executive Branches of the State of Illinois.
  5. Students will be able to identify the participants in the law making process and the steps that are needed to submit a bill and go through the process to become law.
  6. Students will use electronic sources, as well as the Official Website for the State of Illinois (2014) and use a graphic organizer to identify key players in the law making process.
  7. Students will select a bill, find out who sponsored the bill, read the full text, identify dates and actions taken, identify in which chamber the bill currently resides, research the reason for creating the bill, and follow and record the progress through the law making system.
  8. Students will draft a bill and go through the law making process in their school.
  9. Students will read the Illinois Constitution, Article IV and identify the steps needed to submit a bill to become law.
  10. Students will survey the school’s population, draft a bill, create a Senate, House of Representatives, and elect a Governor and proceed through the steps of a bill becoming a law as they argue the positives and negatives of the bill.

CUSTOMIZED SHOPPING FOR:

Government

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The study of geography, according to the C3 Framework, is intended to engage students in geographic inquiry designed to help foster “curiosity about Earth’s wide diversity of environments and cultures,” which rests on “deep knowledge of Earth’s physical and human features.”  One the most important of these features, or at least the one that perhaps best illustrates “the distribution of landforms and water bodies, and historic changes in political boundaries…and cultures,” as called for by the C3 Framework, is the Grand Canyon.

Often referred to as one of the “Seven Natural Wonders of the World,” the Grand Canyon provides students with the quintessential context for engaging in geographic inquiry.  This rich geological, historical, and cultural setting serves as the focus for this VLS geography unit, which engages students in the examination of the history of the Grand Canyon, to include the physical transformation of the canyon.  In addition, students will engage in the investigation and analysis of historical settlement patterns – from the first Native American inhabitants through European and U.S. exploration and settlement, to today – in an attempt to better understand the changes in both the physical and cultural landscape of the Grand Canyon.  

 

Unit Objectives:

  1. Students will engage in inquiry research of the Grand Canyon, and report their findings in a digital presentation.
  2. Students will examine primary and secondary sources to chronicle the different Native American societies that formed in the Grand Canyon region.
  3. Students will review evidence chronicling European and U.S. exploration of the Grand Canyon, and compare and contrast their goals and accomplishments/contributions.
  4. Students will analyze multiple perspectives on the different peoples that settled, and societies that formed, in the Grand Canyon region, using a variety of primary and secondary sources.
  5. Students will evaluate primary and secondary sources in an effort to examine the role of geographical location and challenges, as well as geological features and resources of the Grand Canyon in the settlement of the region.
  6. Students will formulate compelling and supportive research questions about the history and geography of the Grand Canyon.
  7. Students will construct a presentation using primary sources conveying their conclusions about the history and geography of the Grand Canyon.
  8. Students will identify ways in which they can preserve and protect the Grand Canyon and other historical and/or natural resources in their community.

CUSTOMIZED SHOPPING FOR:

Geography

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The study of economics, according to the C3 Framework, is intended to “provide students with the concepts and tools necessary for an economic way of thinking.” To this end, students need to understand the role of markets and exchanges; in particular, the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE).  The development of an “economic way of thinking” must include an understanding of the significant role the NYSE plays in the U.S. and global economy, as the world’s largest securities exchange, where millions of stocks and securities are bought and sold every trading day.   

The VLS unit “New York Stock Exchange” examines the events surrounding its founding, and provides an introduction to the organization and operation of the NYSE.  In addition, the unit engages students in the investigation and analysis of the impact economic crises – from the Stock Market Crash of 1929 to the Dot Com Boom and Bust of the 1990s and early 2000s – have had on the NYSE. 

Unit Objectives:

  1. Students will engage in inquiry research of the New York Stock Exchange, and report their findings in a digital presentation.
  2. Students will use electronic resources and identify possible explanations for the Panic of 1893 and investigate how this compares with other economic crises that impacted the New York Stock Exchange.
  3. Students will locate information about the founding of the New York Stock Exchange, including the Buttonwood Agreement, outline the results of the investigation, and present their findings.
  4. Students will describe the impact of the stock market on the U.S. and global economy.
  5. Students will collect, interpret, and evaluate evidence chronicling the events surrounding the Stock Market Crash of 1929.
  6. Students will analyze from multiple perspectives the relationship between the New York Stock Exchange and the economic crises that faced the nation over the course of the past 125 years, using a variety of primary and secondary sources from these seminal periods in American economic history.
  7. Students will formulate compelling and supportive research questions about the role of the New York Stock Exchange in the economic history of the United States.
  8. Students will construct a presentation using primary sources conveying their conclusions about the effects of the Dot Com Boom and Bust.
  9. Students will trace the growth of the Dow Jones Industrial Average index from the late nineteenth century to today.

CUSTOMIZED SHOPPING FOR:

Economics

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