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William & Mary Gifted Science Curriculum

Grade Levels: Elementary , Middle School

PROGRAM FEATURES

PROGRAM FEATURES


Where's the Beach
Plans for building a children’s camp at the beach are on hold because the town council is worried about beach erosion in Where's the Beach?. Since the camp received a large donation to develop nature-themed experiences, designed to teach children how to protect the environment, the camp manager wants to cooperate with the council. The problem is that she must begin construction quickly to be ready for the summer season. Acting as members of the town council, the students must develop scientifically-based regulations that will satisfy the long-term needs of the town and the plans for the new camp.

Sample Activity: Lesson 2, The Concept of Systems

What a Find
What a Find - What an appropriate title for an exploration of the field of archaeology! Students are put in the role of junior archaeologists at a research museum and discover that construction work has been halted on a new school because historic artifacts were discovered. To determine whether or not the dig is important enough to halt building the school entirely, students learn to excavate and actually conduct the dig -- carefully seeded with “historic artifacts.”


Sample Activity: Lesson 3, Introduction to the Problem

CUSTOMIZED SHOPPING FOR:

Grades 2-4

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Acid, Acid Everywhere
Acid, Acid Everywhere presents that structure of systems through chemistry, ecological habitats, and transportation.This unit poses an ill-structured problem that leads students into an interdisciplinary inquiry about the structure and interaction of several systems, centering around the study of an acid spill on a local highway.


Electricity City
Electricity City provides a creative and interdisciplinary approach to introducing fourth through sixth grade students to electricity. In this simulated activity, a large recreational complex is being built in the middle of a city, and the students’ role is to plan the site’s electrical needs, as well as create additional backup plans. This “real world” problem requires students to analyze the situation, determine what type of research is needed, conduct experiments, and evaluate solutions.

 

CUSTOMIZED SHOPPING FOR:

Grades 4-6

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Animal Populations
Animal Populations integrates population biology and mathematics. The ill-structured problem puts students in the stakeholder role of assistant to the mayor of a small town in which residents are demanding that something be done about the deer that are eating their landscaped plants. Throughout the unit, students deal with physical models, conceptual models, and mathematical models as they tackle the deer problem and the complication of Lyme Disease.

Nuclear Energy: Friend or Foe?
Nuclear Energy: Friend or Foe? explores the effects of nuclear power waste. The topic is introduced through the eyes of a mayor of a town where a nuclear power plant is located. She must decide if the facility can expand its waste disposal techniques. What are the biological implications of radiation? What are the trade-offs with which society must live as we accept nuclear technologies into our lives? These questions are explored by students as they prepare to make recommendations about the use of the nuclear power plant in their fictitious town.

 

Something Fishy: Exploring an Aquatic Ecosystem
Something Fishy: Exploring an Aquatic Ecosystem poses an ill-structured problem that will lead students into an interdisciplinary study about several individual systems and their interactions. The content of the unit focuses on the various systems involved in the pollution of a local body of water: the aquatic ecosystem, chemical reaction systems, government systems, and economic systems. Students are challenged to grapple with real world concerns and develop recommendations through simulation activities based on the scientific process.


No Quick Fix? Exploring Human Body Systems
No Quick Fix: Exploring Human Body Systems uses systems as the fundamental concept to help students understand cell and tuberculosis biology. In a series of widening concentric circles, students learn that the cells are elements in larger systems, such as the immune system and the even larger system of the human body. Students also interact with the human social systems: health care and public education. Students take on the role of physician and begin to search for the cause and resolution of the problem. While unraveling the interactions among various systems, students can appreciate the complexities of staying healthy in the modern world.

 

 

Kendall Hunt is committed to the successful implementation of our programs.  Upon adoption of our program, we will work with district leaders to create a customized plan that maximizes your ability to use The William & Mary Science curriculum to fulfill your instructional vision and goals.  Your trainer will be an expert in the field and many are or have been teachers in the classroom that have successfully used the program.

Professional learning options include:

  • Hands-on, problem-based onsite workshops on a choice of topics, including:
    • Introduction to the program and materials
    • Teaching models
    • Individual training on specific units including collaborative lesson planning
  • Customized 60 or 90-minute webinars

Contact your Curriculum Consultant to discuss your options.

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Professional Development

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