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Illustrative Mathematics - High School

Grade Levels: High School

PROGRAM FEATURES

PROGRAM FEATURES


IM Algebra 1, Geometry, and Algebra 2 lessons are designed with a focus on independent, group, and whole-class instruction, building mathematical understanding and fluency with all students. Teachers will also use Warm-ups and Cool-downs to help guide lesson pacing and planning.

Students who struggle in Algebra 1 are more likely to struggle in subsequent math courses and experience more adverse outcomes. The Algebra 1 Supports Course is designed to help students who need additional support in their Algebra 1 course. Each Algebra 1 Supports Course lesson is associated with a lesson in the Algebra 1 course. The intention is that students experience each Algebra 1 Supports lesson before its associated Algebra 1 lesson. The Algebra 1 Supports lesson helps students learn or remember a skill or concept that is needed to access and find success with the associated Algebra 1 lesson.

 

Why take advantage of print versions and Professional Learning options?

Kendall Hunt offers print versions of student workbooks, teacher guides, and teacher resources to make the most of the Illustrative Mathematics curriculum. Our high-quality workbooks and guides allow teachers to easily follow along and instruct their students while also acting as an additional resource for “creating a world where learners know, use and enjoy mathematics.”

Shifting to a problem-based mathematics curriculum can be a difficult transition for many educators. Professional Learning combined with the digital and print IM math curriculum presents an avenue for teachers to grow and watch their students, in turn, mature into better mathematicians. The certified training also provides support and clarity to educators and administrators while creating an avenue of engagement and deeper understanding.

This isn’t your typical professional learning opportunity. IM Certified Training is taught by IM Certified Facilitators who understand that each teacher’s needs is unique. Districts select the professional learning experience that best meets their needs-from an introductory session, to year-long support, to a three-year development package that builds teacher, coach, and leader capacity.

Have questions and want to inquire about print and Professional Learning options? Please contact your sales consultant here.

 

 

Algebra1.jpg

Algebra I - Teacher Guides include Support Guide

Each lesson and Unit Tells a Story

The story of Algebra 1 mathematics is told in seven units. Each unit has a narrative that describes the mathematical work that will unfold in that unit. Each lesson in the unit has a narrative. Lesson narratives explain:

  • A description of the mathematical content of the lesson and its place in the learning sequence.
  • The meaning of any new terms introduced in the lesson.
  • How the mathematical practices come into play, as appropriate.

Activities within lessons also have a narrative, which explain:

  • The mathematical purpose of the activity and its place in the learning sequence.
  • What students are doing during the activity.
  • What teacher needs to look for while students are working on an activity to orchestrate an effective synthesis.
  • Connections to the mathematical practices when appropriate.

Launch - Work - Synthesize

Each classroom activity has three phases.

The Launch

During the launch, the teacher makes sure that students understand the context (if there is one) and what the problem is asking them to do. This is not the same as making sure the students know how to do the problem—part of the work that students should be doing for themselves is figuring out how to solve the problem.

Student Work Time

The launch for an activity frequently includes suggestions for grouping students. This gives students the opportunity to work individually, with a partner, or in small groups.

Activity Synthesis

During the activity synthesis, the teacher orchestrates some time for students to synthesize what they have learned. This time is used to ensure that all students have an opportunity to understand the mathematical goal of the activity and situate the new learning within students' previous understanding.

Practice Problems

Each lesson includes an associated set of practice problems. Teachers may decide to assign practice problems for homework or for extra practice in class. They may decide to collect and score it or to provide students with answers ahead of time for self-assessment. It is up to teachers to decide which problems to assign (including assigning none at all).

The practice problem set associated with each lesson includes a few questions about the contents of that lesson, plus additional problems that review material from earlier in the unit and previous units. Distributed practice (revisiting the same content over time) is more effective than massed practice (a large amount of practice on one topic, but all at once). 

Are You Ready For More?

Select classroom activities include an opportunity for differentiation for students ready for more of a challenge. We think of them as the "mathematical dessert" to follow the "mathematical entrée" of a classroom activity.

Every extension problem is made available to all students with the heading "Are You Ready for More?" These problems go deeper into grade-level mathematics and often make connections between the topic at hand and other concepts. Some of these problems extend the work of the associated activity, but some of them involve work from prior grades, prior units in the course, or reflect work that is related to the K–12 curriculum but a type of problem not required by the standards. They are not routine or procedural, and they are not just "the same thing again but with harder numbers."

They are intended to be used on an opt-in basis by students if they finish the main class activity early or want to do more mathematics on their own. It is not expected that an entire class engages in Are You Ready for More? problems, and it is not expected that any student works on all of them. Are You Ready for More? problems may also be good fodder for a Problem of the Week or similar structure.

Instructional Routines

The kind of instruction appropriate in any particular lesson depends on the learning goals of that lesson. Some lessons may be devoted to developing a concept, others to mastering a procedural skill, yet others to applying mathematics to a real-world problem. These aspects of mathematical proficiency are interwoven. These materials include a small set of activity structures and reference a small, high-leverage set of teacher moves that become more and more familiar to teachers and students as the year progresses.

The first instance of each routine in a course includes more detailed guidance for how to successfully conduct the routine. Subsequent instances include more abbreviated guidance, so as not to unnecessarily inflate the word count of the teacher guide.

Digital Routines indicate required or suggested applications of technology, appearing repeatedly throughout the curriculum. Activities using the routines are flagged for the teacher, which is helpful for lesson planning and for focusing the work of professional development.

Some of the instructional routines, known as Mathematical Language Routines (MLR), were developed by the Stanford University UL/SCALE team. The purpose of each MLR is described here, but you can read more about supports for students with emerging English language proficiency in the Supporting English Language Learners section.

Analyze it

Anticipate, monitor, select, sequence, connect

Aspects of mathematical modeling

Card Sort

Construct It

Draw It

Extend it

Fit it

Math Talk

MLR4: Information gap cards

Notice and Wonder

Take turns

Think pair share

Which One Doesn’t Belong?

 

CUSTOMIZED SHOPPING FOR:

Algebra 1

ADD THE FOLLOWING:
CLASSROOMS/TEACHERS
STUDENTS
BUILD MY PROGRAM

Geometry.jpg

 

Geometry - Teacher Guide includes Support Guide

Each lesson and Unit Tells a Story

The story of Geometry is told in eight units. Each unit has a narrative that describes the mathematical work that will unfold in that unit. Each lesson in the unit has a narrative. Lesson narratives explain:

  • A description of the mathematical content of the lesson and its place in the learning sequence.
  • The meaning of any new terms introduced in the lesson.
  • How the mathematical practices come into play, as appropriate.

Activities within lessons also have a narrative, which explain:

  • The mathematical purpose of the activity and its place in the learning sequence.
  • What students are doing during the activity.
  • What teacher needs to look for while students are working on an activity to orchestrate an effective synthesis.
  • Connections to the mathematical practices when appropriate.

Launch - Work - Synthesize

Each classroom activity has three phases.

The Launch

During the launch, the teacher makes sure that students understand the context (if there is one) and what the problem is asking them to do. This is not the same as making sure the students know how to do the problem—part of the work that students should be doing for themselves is figuring out how to solve the problem.

Student Work Time

The launch for an activity frequently includes suggestions for grouping students. This gives students the opportunity to work individually, with a partner, or in small groups.

Activity Synthesis

During the activity synthesis, the teacher orchestrates some time for students to synthesize what they have learned. This time is used to ensure that all students have an opportunity to understand the mathematical goal of the activity and situate the new learning within students' previous understanding.

Practice Problems

Each lesson includes an associated set of practice problems. Teachers may decide to assign practice problems for homework or for extra practice in class. They may decide to collect and score it or to provide students with answers ahead of time for self-assessment. It is up to teachers to decide which problems to assign (including assigning none at all).

The practice problem set associated with each lesson includes a few questions about the contents of that lesson, plus additional problems that review material from earlier in the unit and previous units. Distributed practice (revisiting the same content over time) is more effective than massed practice (a large amount of practice on one topic, but all at once). 

Are You Ready For More?

Select classroom activities include an opportunity for differentiation for students ready for more of a challenge. We think of them as the "mathematical dessert" to follow the "mathematical entrée" of a classroom activity.

Every extension problem is made available to all students with the heading "Are You Ready for More?" These problems go deeper into grade-level mathematics and often make connections between the topic at hand and other concepts. Some of these problems extend the work of the associated activity, but some of them involve work from prior grades, prior units in the course, or reflect work that is related to the K–12 curriculum but a type of problem not required by the standards. They are not routine or procedural, and they are not just "the same thing again but with harder numbers."

They are intended to be used on an opt-in basis by students if they finish the main class activity early or want to do more mathematics on their own. It is not expected that an entire class engages in Are You Ready for More? problems, and it is not expected that any student works on all of them. Are You Ready for More? problems may also be good fodder for a Problem of the Week or similar structure.

Instructional Routines

The kind of instruction appropriate in any particular lesson depends on the learning goals of that lesson. Some lessons may be devoted to developing a concept, others to mastering a procedural skill, yet others to applying mathematics to a real-world problem. These aspects of mathematical proficiency are interwoven. These materials include a small set of activity structures and reference a small, high-leverage set of teacher moves that become more and more familiar to teachers and students as the year progresses.

The first instance of each routine in a course includes more detailed guidance for how to successfully conduct the routine. Subsequent instances include more abbreviated guidance, so as not to unnecessarily inflate the word count of the teacher guide.

Digital Routines indicate required or suggested applications of technology, appearing repeatedly throughout the curriculum. Activities using the routines are flagged for the teacher, which is helpful for lesson planning and for focusing the work of professional development.

Some of the instructional routines, known as Mathematical Language Routines (MLR), were developed by the Stanford University UL/SCALE team. The purpose of each MLR is described here, but you can read more about supports for students with emerging English language proficiency in the Supporting English Language Learners section.

Analyze it

Anticipate, monitor, select, sequence, connect

Aspects of mathematical modeling

Card Sort

Construct It

Draw It

Extend it

Fit it

Math Talk

MLR4: Information gap cards

Notice and Wonder

Take turns

Think pair share

Which One Doesn’t Belong?

 

CUSTOMIZED SHOPPING FOR:

Geometry

ADD THE FOLLOWING:
CLASSROOMS/TEACHERS
STUDENTS
BUILD MY PROGRAM

Algebra2.jpg

 

Algebra II - Teacher Guide (includes Support Guide)

Each lesson and Unit Tells a Story

The story of Algebra 2 mathematics is told in seven units. Each unit has a narrative that describes the mathematical work that will unfold in that unit. Each lesson in the unit has a narrative. Lesson narratives explain:

  • A description of the mathematical content of the lesson and its place in the learning sequence.
  • The meaning of any new terms introduced in the lesson.
  • How the mathematical practices come into play, as appropriate.

Activities within lessons also have a narrative, which explain:

  • The mathematical purpose of the activity and its place in the learning sequence.
  • What students are doing during the activity.
  • What teacher needs to look for while students are working on an activity to orchestrate an effective synthesis.
  • Connections to the mathematical practices when appropriate.

Launch - Work - Synthesize

Each classroom activity has three phases.

The Launch

During the launch, the teacher makes sure that students understand the context (if there is one) and what the problem is asking them to do. This is not the same as making sure the students know how to do the problem—part of the work that students should be doing for themselves is figuring out how to solve the problem.

Student Work Time

The launch for an activity frequently includes suggestions for grouping students. This gives students the opportunity to work individually, with a partner, or in small groups.

Activity Synthesis

During the activity synthesis, the teacher orchestrates some time for students to synthesize what they have learned. This time is used to ensure that all students have an opportunity to understand the mathematical goal of the activity and situate the new learning within students' previous understanding.

Practice Problems

Each lesson includes an associated set of practice problems. Teachers may decide to assign practice problems for homework or for extra practice in class. They may decide to collect and score it or to provide students with answers ahead of time for self-assessment. It is up to teachers to decide which problems to assign (including assigning none at all).

The practice problem set associated with each lesson includes a few questions about the contents of that lesson, plus additional problems that review material from earlier in the unit and previous units. Distributed practice (revisiting the same content over time) is more effective than massed practice (a large amount of practice on one topic, but all at once). 

Are You Ready For More?

Select classroom activities include an opportunity for differentiation for students ready for more of a challenge. We think of them as the "mathematical dessert" to follow the "mathematical entrée" of a classroom activity.

Every extension problem is made available to all students with the heading "Are You Ready for More?" These problems go deeper into grade-level mathematics and often make connections between the topic at hand and other concepts. Some of these problems extend the work of the associated activity, but some of them involve work from prior grades, prior units in the course, or reflect work that is related to the K–12 curriculum but a type of problem not required by the standards. They are not routine or procedural, and they are not just "the same thing again but with harder numbers."

They are intended to be used on an opt-in basis by students if they finish the main class activity early or want to do more mathematics on their own. It is not expected that an entire class engages in Are You Ready for More? problems, and it is not expected that any student works on all of them. Are You Ready for More? problems may also be good fodder for a Problem of the Week or similar structure.

Instructional Routines

The kind of instruction appropriate in any particular lesson depends on the learning goals of that lesson. Some lessons may be devoted to developing a concept, others to mastering a procedural skill, yet others to applying mathematics to a real-world problem. These aspects of mathematical proficiency are interwoven. These materials include a small set of activity structures and reference a small, high-leverage set of teacher moves that become more and more familiar to teachers and students as the year progresses.

The first instance of each routine in a course includes more detailed guidance for how to successfully conduct the routine. Subsequent instances include more abbreviated guidance, so as not to unnecessarily inflate the word count of the teacher guide.

Digital Routines indicate required or suggested applications of technology, appearing repeatedly throughout the curriculum. Activities using the routines are flagged for the teacher, which is helpful for lesson planning and for focusing the work of professional development.

Some of the instructional routines, known as Mathematical Language Routines (MLR), were developed by the Stanford University UL/SCALE team. The purpose of each MLR is described here, but you can read more about supports for students with emerging English language proficiency in the Supporting English Language Learners section.

Analyze it

Anticipate, monitor, select, sequence, connect

Aspects of mathematical modeling

Card Sort

Construct It

Draw It

Extend it

Fit it

Math Talk

MLR4: Information gap cards

Notice and Wonder

Take turns

Think pair share

Which One Doesn’t Belong?

 

CUSTOMIZED SHOPPING FOR:

Algebra II

ADD THE FOLLOWING:
CLASSROOMS/TEACHERS
STUDENTS
BUILD MY PROGRAM

CUSTOMIZED SHOPPING FOR:

Algebra 1 Supports

ADD THE FOLLOWING:
CLASSROOMS/TEACHERS
STUDENTS
BUILD MY PROGRAM

Performed by IM Certified Facilitators, we’ll make sure that the transition into a problem-based curriculum is comprehensive and easy for educators to implement.

Districts select the Professional Learning experience that best meets their needs-from an introductory session, to year-long support, to a three-year development package that builds teacher, coach, and leader capacity which can be done in person and virtually.

 

IM, Kendall Hunt High School Professional Learning Catalog

CUSTOMIZED SHOPPING FOR:

High School Professional Learning

ADD THE FOLLOWING:
BUILD MY PROGRAM

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